CHAPTER 5 - Unexpected Benefits

CHAPTER 5 - Unexpected Benefits

CHAPTER 5

FISHING TECHNIQUES - UNEXPECTED BENEFITS



The basic design criterion of the Flying Lure is a natural, forward glide on the free fall, and it makes it incredibly productive in its own right. But the physical properties that were required to achieve this unique lure action actually give the lure additional benefits, some of which even we didn't expect. Extensive field-testing found unique aspects of the Flying Lure's design and abilities that often made It the best tool for situations other than that for which It was designed! Here are just a few examples.

KEEPING THE LURE WHERE THE FISH ARE

Variations of a stationary retrieve are HOT bass tactics these days. Although one northeastern outdoor writer wrote of "zero speed control" presentation of plastic worms a dozen years ago, the tactic didn't gain national prominence until the mid-eighties, as a Florida-born technique called "dead sticking" a worm. Most recently, the addition of a slight vibrat­ing type movement to a stationary plastic worm, a method called "shakin'" by its West Coast proponents, has been highly publicized as the key factor In several major tournament wins, Walt until you try "shakin"' with the Flying Lure! Conventional jigs and plas­tic worm rigs have the weight located adjacent to the line-tie. This design had to be reversed to achieve the forward swimming action the Flying Lure was designed to provide. The resultant lure, although not specifically designed with "dead sticking" or "shakin™ in mind, is far and away the best lure for those techniques, primarily because of its reversed weight distribu­tion! Because the weight is at the far end of the lure, jiggling the rod tip while the lure rests on the bottom results In a fantastic, quivering action of the skirt or tail section of thB lure -- without moving the lure from Its stationary position. Couple the Flying Lure's ability to get into the best fish-holding spots with its superior "stationary retrieve" performance, and you've got a truly winning combination. It not only "shakes" better than any other soft plastic lure, it "shakes" in better locations!

CASTING DISTANCE, ACCURACY AND EASE ARE ALL IMPROVED

Since the lure keeps swimming forward under water, you always get longer casts using a Flying Lure. But an additional by-product of the hydrody-namic shape and precision weighting of the Flying Lure is Improved perfor­mance while airborne. Casts can be made longer, with a lower trajectory, and much more accurately, EVEN IN THE WIND. And this is accomplished without sacrificing a slow descent through the water.

MULTIPLE PRESENTATIONS ON ONE CAST

Since the lure swims forward In the water, yet rises quickly when it is retrieved, it can be made to descend many times per cast. This gives a fisherman the ability to make a series of underwater "casts" be alternately retrieving the lure and then releasing it to swim forward again. This feature lets a fisherman make new "casts" underwater to any obstructions or struc­ture that the lure passes by during the retrieve. By shifting the rod tip to one side or the other just before allowing the lure to "engage its forward gear," the flying Lure's swimming motion can even be aimed.

FOLLOW UP MISSED STRIKES INSTANTLY

Even the pros miss a fish every now and then. When you "set on air" while fishing a Flying Lure, you just drip the rod tip and the lure Immediately swims back towards the spot where the strike occurred. You'll be surprised how often that fish will instantly jump on the lure following this "kickback" maneuver. And usually, that second take is a smashing strike, even if the first hit was only a tentative nibble!

EXPLORE AN AREA FROM MANY ANGLES WITH A SINGLE CAST

As alluded to earlier, by simply changing the position of the rod tip; the Flying Lure can be made to swim in different directions. For example, if a lure is cast into a sunken tree and then retrieved to the surface, you can move the rod tip to the left or right, slightly changing the orientation of the lure. As a result, the Flying Lure will swim back into the tree at a slightly different angle, to a different place. It's sometimes possible to "explore" every nook and cranny of a complex submerged piece of cover on one cast.

MAKE A LURE SWIM LEFT OR RIGHT

By pinching off a small piece of plastic on the right or left side of the lure's nose, it can be made to "circle in" to the left or right, in a wide or a narrow arc, on the forward glide. Cast parallel to a dock, and pause to let the work swim "around" each piling on the way back.

SNAG RESISTANCE

The Flying Lure's ability to swim deep Into the "hollows" under cover is a key element in its productivity. It goes Into places that bass live, like no other lure. The places bass live are by definition, "snaggy." Because the Flying Lure's primary advantage is in reaching into those places, the Impression is that the lure must be great at putting Itself in jeopardy. When Alex Langer set out to design Ihe lure that eventually became the Flying Lure, a tool with the ability to swim forward, underneath cover was his only goal. He was more than willing to accept hanging-up often, for a chance to present a lure In these un-fished bass hideouts. However, the design he eventually came up with turned out to be almost magical in its ability to avoid snagsl You'll hang one up every now and then, to be sure. Some of the places that It allows you to fish are simply too snag infested not to hang up. But considering the density of the cover you'll put the Flying Lure into; the frequency of snags is almost inconsequential. The Flying Lure's unique, broad bottomed design and unusual weight distri­bution keep the two main snag producing contact points, the hook eye and the hook point, upraised on the retrieve. The majority of the weight is concentrated at the end of the lure farthest from the fishing line, so the hook eye Is never forced to pick up bottom debris like an ordinary jig or plastic worm. The lure easily slides over weeds and other obstructions with the hook eye raised, and rides across branches, ropes, etc., upright with its smooth, wide bottom in contact with the cover, not on its side or upside down where the hook could contact and snag the object. As indicated, nothing could get into the places the Flying Lure goes without hanging up occasionally. But it's a far less frequent occurrence than you would imagine.

CASTING DISTANCE, ACCURACY AND EASE ARE ALL IMPROVED

Since the lure keeps swimming forward under water, you always get longer casts using a Flying Lure. But an additional by-product of the hydrody-namic shape and precision weighting of the Flying Lure is Improved perfor­mance while airborne. Casts can be made longer, with a lower trajectory, and much more accurately, EVEN IN THE WIND. And this is accomplished without sacrificing a slow descent through the water.

The Flying Lure's ability to swim deep Into the "hollows" under cover is a key element in its productivity. It goes Into places that bass live, like no other lure. The places bass live are by definition, "snaggy." Because the Flying Lure's primary advantage is in reaching into those places, the Impression is that the lure must be great at putting itself in jeopardy.

When Alex Langer set out to design the lure that eventually became the Flying Lure, a tool with the ability to swim forward, underneath cover was his only goal. He was more than willing to accept hanging-up often, for a chance to present a lure In these un-fished bass hideouts. However, the design he eventually came up with turned out to be almost magical in its ability to avoid snags! You'll hang one up every now and then, to be sure. Some of the places that It allows you to fish are simply too snag infested not to hang up. But considering the density of the cover you'll put the Flying Lure into; the frequency of snags is almost inconsequential.

The Flying Lure's unique, broad bottomed design and unusual weight distribution keep the two main snag producing contact points, the hook eye and the hook point, upraised on the retrieve. The majority of the weight is concentrated at the end of the lure farthest from the fishing line, so the hook eye Is never forced to pick up bottom debris like an ordinary jig or plastic worm. The lure easily slides over weeds and other obstructions with the hook eye raised, and rides across branches, ropes, etc., upright with its smooth, wide bottom in contact with the cover, not on its side or upside down where the hook could contact and snag the object.

As indicated, nothing could get into the places the Flying Lure goes without hanging up occasionally. But it's a far less frequent occurrence than you would imagine.

NO EXPOSED METAL FOR FISH TO DETECT

During the development of the Flying Lure, Alex Langer made a purposeful decision to encase the metal weight completely in the plastic body of the lure. This was done for reasons having to do with consistency In rigging. It had to be virtually Impossible to rig the lure "out of balance" or skewed, to insure that the precise hydrodynamic shape wasn't affected by hasty rigging when the fish are active. If just so happened that this design fell in with what was to become accepted angling wisdom by the time the lure was made into a commercial product. By eliminating the exposed metal, a more uniform, "soft" feel Is achieved, resulting In fewer occasions of a fish rejecting the lure before the angler has a chance to react. The hollow body cavity can also hold com­mercial "chemo-receptor" lure potions (sent/taste mixtures), which many anglers feel with decrease the possibility that a fish will eject the lure.